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Username Post: Russell Green River Works Knife        (Topic#943117)
StuqinCA
Member
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10-17-16 13:47.49 - Post#2627299    







Recently rescued a Russell Green River Works knife, I guess its a "boning" knife(?) I looked up some basic information, but I'm hoping to find out a little more about the production date, etc. Had a hard time finding a similar logo online - anyone have any ideas?

(thanks)

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Edited by StuqinCA on 10-17-16 13:50.48. Reason for edit: No reason given.
 
palmerdl
Master Member KnifeNut!
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10-17-16 15:27.02 - Post#2627300    


    In response to StuqinCA

Know nothing about the history, but it looks too big for a boning knife. With a 10" blade, I would call it a slicing or 'steaking' knife.
Don

Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get use to it.


 
antonio_luiz
Master Member KnifeNut!
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10-19-16 23:06.00 - Post#2627325    


    In response to palmerdl

Boning knives do run to 10" but given its relatively unworn condition I don't believe that this one was used in a commercial meat processing line, although it could have been used in a slower paced environment like a butcher shop. Boning knives used in production lines have a very hard life and get worn out pretty quickly - workers at a facility will often bulk-buy them keep costs down since they wear them down with great regularity

Was talking to a work colleague today who used to work on the boning line at various meatworks. We didn't go into the topic of what style knives he used but the legacy health problems associated with this work (RSI/Carpal Tunnel/joint calcification/back problems.....) now makes me glad that I didn't get to work in this industry
I'm paranoid only cause everyone's out to get me!


 
brianWE
Master Member KnifeNut!
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10-19-16 23:41.03 - Post#2627327    


    In response to antonio_luiz

Just a thought....
There was a large butcher knife on the Mil forum a few years ago.
Certainly didn't look military but it was marked as such.
Seems it was meant for butchering animals "foraged" in the field.
Multi-purpose. After all, soldiers can't carry a bunch of specialist knives in the field.
Not suggesting this one is military...
brianWE
Opinions? I have many. Some I don't, even, know about until I read my posts.


 
antonio_luiz
Master Member KnifeNut!
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10-20-16 20:41.38 - Post#2627345    


    In response to brianWE

Reminds me of the knife carried by a bloke I did some shooting with in Goulburn back in the 70's. He was an abattoir worker - he had 1 knife and 1 gun (a Browning auto) and was extremely competent with both
I'm paranoid only cause everyone's out to get me!


 
StuqinCA
Member
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10-29-16 10:39.00 - Post#2627457    


    In response to antonio_luiz

Thanks guys. I agree, its pretty large for a boning knife. I was hoping someone would chime it with some info on the maker before I clean it up - just in case...
Cheers!
 
Rey Zhourej
Journeyman KnifeNut!
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11-23-16 13:51.29 - Post#2627709    


    In response to StuqinCA

The John Russell Co. was in business from 1875 to 1941. The first use of that trademark(arrow under the Russell name)was used in 1879.If I had to guess I would say it was made around 1900 or a little after.Russell folding knives and hunters are pretty collectible;kitchen knives are pretty much nice users. I have a few.
 
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