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    Username Post: How to deburr?        (Topic#893382)
    Joseph S
    Journeyman KnifeNut!
    *
    02-11-11 14:23.08 - Post#2290522    



    What are good ways to deburr when sharpening? I'm new to sharpening and am unsure about the best way to do this?
    I was taught to strop to remove it, but the burr is hard to take off at times. Do I need to remove it on every stone?

    Thanks


    Edited by Joseph S on 02-11-11 14:29.37. Reason for edit: No reason given.
     


    BurkeCutlery
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-11-11 15:22.20 - Post#2290557    


        In response to Joseph S

    Cut into something soft, like cork or felt de-burring pads between stones.
    Eamon Burke

    Burke Cutlery Services

    Finish Sharpening on CKTG


     
    tk59
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-11-11 15:38.19 - Post#2290567    


        In response to BurkeCutlery

    If the burr is difficult to remove, chances are you haven't finished abrading it down. In a perfect world, it would fall off on its own. Once it's really floppy, then raise your angle slighly and strop on anything, basically. If you still can't get it off, use something more abrasive or you can just get it over with and run through cork or a piece of rubber, etc.
     
    ytreich
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-11-11 15:47.55 - Post#2290573    


        In response to tk59

    Real men deburr on their tongue.
    Trust me, for I like big butts and I cannot lie.


     
    ken123
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-11-11 19:08.57 - Post#2290640    


        In response to ytreich

    The best way to deburr is to make the smallest burr you can. Then simply abrade it off - my method of preference. Not always possible but an ideal to shoot for. Creating a burr at each grit is excessive. The straight razor guys know this and more knife guys should follow their lead here. Alternating sides further reduces burr formation. On a good day, I might not create burr until ~ 4k. On a great day at 16k.

    It is possible but very difficult to not generate burr with power grinding. Running the edge against some wood will remove burr, but you get a ragged edge. At this point you no longer have two sides meeting and just have to redefine the edge again.

    ---
    Ken
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    ytreich
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-12-11 02:26.12 - Post#2290751    


        In response to ken123

    Oh sure. Get all technical on us Dr. Fussbudget.
    Trust me, for I like big butts and I cannot lie.


     
    tk59
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-12-11 03:16.59 - Post#2290773    


        In response to ken123

    • ken123 Said:
    ...simply abrade it off - my method of preference. Not always possible but an ideal to shoot for...



    Exactly.

    • ken123 Said:
    ...Creating a burr at each grit is excessive. The straight razor guys know this and more knife guys should follow their lead here...



    I think this depends a bit on the pressure you are using when you sharpen. If you are bending the edge repeatedly, it is being weakened and should be removed.

    • ken123 Said:
    ...Alternating sides further reduces burr formation. On a good day, I might not create burr until ~ 4k. On a great day at 16k...



    The way an edge wears is not the same along the entire edge. To retain your blade profile, you should expect to get a larger burr where there is little wear and nearly no burr where the wear is more significant.

    • ken123 Said:
    ...Running the edge against some wood will remove burr, but you get a ragged edge...



    Very much agree on this one. If it's that hard to get the burr off, it is due to an imperfection in the sharpening job and it's best to keep working, probably on a fine stone, if you're doing it right.
     
    Joseph S
    Journeyman KnifeNut!
    *
    02-12-11 03:24.58 - Post#2290776    


        In response to ken123

    • ken123 Said:
    The best way to deburr is to make the smallest burr you can. Then simply abrade it off - my method of preference. Not always possible but an ideal to shoot for.


    Abrading the burr: Is that by light strokes on each side to remove it? Do I need to flip the burr to weaken it first?

    • In reply to:
    Creating a burr at each grit is excessive. The straight razor guys know this and more knife guys should follow their lead here. Alternating sides further reduces burr formation. On a good day, I might not create burr until ~ 4k. On a great day at 16k.



    This sounds like a good idea. Can you elaborate? If I don't create a burr at each grit level how do I know I've gotten the knife as sharp as I can? If you don't create a burr at the lower grits like 220 or 1000 do you just sharpen them close to sharp and then work the edge on the higher grits?

    Thanks



    Edited by Joseph S on 02-12-11 03:33.35. Reason for edit: No reason given.
     
    locutus
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-12-11 03:36.06 - Post#2290781    


        In response to Joseph S

    The "abrasion resistance" of the steel has a role to play as well.

    On the low end, and medium steels, I find light stropping to work well.

    On the higher end steels, I usually slice off a small piece of hard leather. (the operative word here being SMALL)
    DARK LORD OF THE SWARF


     
    tk59
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-12-11 04:21.52 - Post#2290815    


        In response to locutus

    • locutus Said:
    The "abrasion resistance" of the steel has a role to play as well.

    On the low end, and medium steels, I find light stropping to work well.

    On the higher end steels, I usually slice off a small piece of hard leather. (the operative word here being SMALL)


    better wear resistance = takes longer
    patience is key, imo
     


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