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Username Post: How do i make curly maple grain pop        (Topic#880799)
fireball1821
Member
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06-22-10 15:16.23 - Post#2155203    



what type of stain or dye should i use to make the pattern pop out
 


RC1947
Master Member KnifeNut!
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06-23-10 04:13.36 - Post#2155545    


    In response to fireball1821

What type of finish do you apply? I mix two different stains (Minwax red mahogany & gunstock) to Watco Danish oil and soak the handle in it until it reaches the desired effect, which is more of a tint than applying straight stain. You can also use leather dye in the color that suits you, and then apply your finish, if you're after something more darkly dramatic.

Experiment with a smooth sanded scrap before going for broke with the handle. RC


 
fireball1821
Member
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06-23-10 17:16.10 - Post#2155967    


    In response to fireball1821

will it make the grain show rc
 
RC1947
Master Member KnifeNut!
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06-25-10 04:40.40 - Post#2157035    


    In response to fireball1821

Yes, the softer areas take in more stain than the hard, though it's all relative to how you choose to color it how dramatic the effect is. That's why I use a diluted staining process; nothing happens immediately, but further soaking (put the stain/finish in a can or jar that allows you to immerse the handle)will bring out further detail. After the wood has soaked in your color, you can steel wool the Maple to help the hard areas lighten up a bit. RC


 
RC1947
Master Member KnifeNut!
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06-25-10 04:54.11 - Post#2157049    


    In response to RC1947

this isn't maple, but walnut, though I use the same procedure.


 
fireball1821
Member
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06-25-10 16:28.35 - Post#2157571    


    In response to RC1947

where can i get danish oil and how much would it be
 
RC1947
Master Member KnifeNut!
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06-26-10 08:02.06 - Post#2157859    


    In response to fireball1821

You can use Watco Danish oil, Minwax Antique oil, or Formby's Tung oil. All, or at least one, should be available at a hardware store, or perhaps a paint store. Price is about $8, and will finish many knife handles. Good luck, RC


 
xxDaBroxx
Member
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12-30-10 07:13.24 - Post#2261437    


    In response to RC1947

Awesome tip with the watering down of the stain. Have to file that in the back of my brain somewhere.
 
Soilarch
Member
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01-22-11 06:29.33 - Post#2277139    


    In response to xxDaBroxx

The way it is typically done in the custom guitar or woodworking world is to apply a dye (wood or leather, water or alcohol...doesn't really matter) like has been stated. But then you can "sand back" the wood a little bit. What happens is dark parts remain dark and the lighter areas go back to natural maple. Then you can finish with whatever stain/oil/poly concoction you want. OR you can use a second color of dye, and a third...yada yada yada.

Comes down to how much time and how much OCD you have

Definitely experiment some. I think of it as tie-dying for grown men.

Use google search words like "aniline dye" "Figured Maple" "Sand back" or just read this to wet the palette: Dye Maple Explanation: Lumberjocks

That may not be quite the effect you're going for but remember the figure in the particle piece of wood makes all the difference in the world, and you can choose your own colors. That piece there is completely different than the quilted or flame that is typical of knife scales.

 
tomdog744
Member
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05-14-11 08:58.50 - Post#2337726    


    In response to Soilarch

In the 8 replies I did not see the Aquafortis reagent method mentions. I've used Aquafortis (Nitric acid stain) on several muzzleloaders with curly maple stocks and am stunned at the 3D effect that this solution yields. Below is an article from Track of the Wolf Muzzleloaders. They do not sell aquafortis anymore but I do have their new contact for it. I've included that contact information as well. Good luck!

http://www.trackofthewolf.com/categ...

Dear Tom:

Thank you for your inquiry about Aquafortis Reagent for staining curly maple.

Formerly made by Wahkon Bay, the new owner is:

Michael Lea & Daughter, Gunsmiths
2109 Summit Street
Columbus, OH 43201-1351

Tel: 614-291-4757
oldguns2109@sbcglobal.net
 
MikeStewart
Master Member KnifeNut!
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05-14-11 13:03.27 - Post#2337769    


    In response to tomdog744

Or.........

You could just do it the Real Old World way - without any commercial stain and just use Potassium Permanganate and water

Like this

Click it.

They probably used this before Ace hardware and minwax were in business.

You can buy Potassium Permanganate in the plumbing department of better Stores.

A Teaspoon in a jar of water will do dozens of knife handles.

Don't waste money on Exotic Stains.
BRKCA MIKE #01
NJKCA #041

"I Am America"

Bark River Facebook Group - Join Today

RIP Chris + 1


 
Cornicus
Journeyman KnifeNut!
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10-26-13 08:24.02 - Post#2571745    


    In response to fireball1821

I usually start with 80 grit paper, sand the wood until it's all rough, then put linseed oil on it.

Then I'll go up the line of grits to 1200 applying linseed after each move.

After the 1200 is done, your handle will be silky and the grain will really pop from the oil. I never use stains or varnishes because I think it strips the natural beauty from the wood. What you do is your choice!

 
Big Mike
Master Member KnifeNut!
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11-05-13 10:33.11 - Post#2573288    


    In response to Cornicus

  • Cornicus Said:
I usually start with 80 grit paper, sand the wood until it's all rough, then put linseed oil on it.

Then I'll go up the line of grits to 1200 applying linseed after each move.

After the 1200 is done, your handle will be silky and the grain will really pop from the oil. I never use stains or varnishes because I think it strips the natural beauty from the wood. What you do is your choice!







If your going to use Linseed Oil, the key is to use a 50/50 mix of Boiled Linseed Oil and Shellac, this mixture will dry quickly and allow you to put on several coats in a timely fashion.

Some makers here use six coats or more to finish their handles.




Big Mike


“Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.”

― Sun Tzu, The Art of War



Semper Vigilis


 
Cornicus
Journeyman KnifeNut!
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11-06-13 22:57.28 - Post#2573564    


    In response to Big Mike

Thanks! You learn something every day.
 
Robert C
Master Member KnifeNut!
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12-25-13 16:19.53 - Post#2581408    


    In response to Cornicus

Research the term "chatoyance" which is the technique to make the grain have a three dimensional look ! I actually remembered such a word at 12 midnight !!
 


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