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    Username Post: Buffing and Polishing Carbon Knife        (Topic#813893)
    Marko Tsourkan
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    02-01-08 03:52.09 - Post#1437498    



    Hi,
    I am new to this forum but find it very informative. Thanks for sharing information.
    I purchased several second-hand Japanese Western style knives recently. I haven't received them yet, but from the picture is looks like these are carbon steel knives.
    Upon receipt, I consider shipping them to D&R Sharpening Solutions for sharpening and repairing blades, but afterwards, I would like to learn to sharpen them myself.
    My question is not about sharpening but rather about buffing and polishing. When you have carbon steel knives that are stained and scratched from previous usage as well as sharpening, is it possible to buff and polish them to bring them to a factory condition shine? Does one need to do it on a buffer/grinder type machine or can it be done by hand on fine water stones? What grade stones would be suitable for polishing the blade? Does one need to keep the knife on 90 degree angle to the stone to go with the grain of the blade? If one does it on a buffing machine, what kind of paste would one recommend? Does buffing pose any danger to blade's tampering?
    I am not a professional chef (I admit that I like knives more than I like cooking, though I like cooking too) but I would like to keep my knives polished and shiny even thought I intend to use them regularly.
    Any information will be appreciated. Thank you in advance.

    Marko
    I love fools’ experiments. I am always making them. C.Darwin

    Join Me on Facebook

    www.markotsourkan.com


     


    jonowee
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    Re: Buffing and Polishing Carbon Kn
    02-01-08 05:26.49 - Post#1437551    


        In response to Marko Tsourkan

    If they are as you say western style knives and most of the time the blade would be solid carbon steel, so the whole blade will patina up even after you polish the whole face.
    In my limited experience, simpler carbon steel patina and grey up easily; so polishing isn't that worth it.

    Again in my limited experience, for single bevel or wide bevel knives like a nakiri polishing is easier since I've only tried blade polishing on them (not western style knives).
    I start by levelling the face/bevel out on a coarse stone and stepping up to the finer cutting stone 1000-ish to check whether I missed any spots. My finest grit stone is a King 6K, which got me most of the way to mirror; but the iron cladding scratches easily if I'm not careful. Even with the 6K, it's a synthetic stone and it'll still leave scratch marks under the shiny surface... shiny but no smooth mirror polish that comes with expensive polishing natural stones or the shortcut.

    The shortcut to me is a stiff buff loaded with a cutting compound to remove scratches, then a loose leaf buff loaded with polishing compound. If you're working with machine, do it freehand without gloves so if it heats up you know when to ease off. Then after polishing, you would still would have to sharpen the knife since the buffs dull knives.

    I have cheated before by using metal polishing paste and a cloth to hand polish to get a shiny finish. But the existing scratches are clearly visible behind the shiny face, I haven't tried the polishing paste method following work on waterstones. I might try it this coming week.

    Here are a few references:
    http://www.knifeforums.com/forums/s...
    which links to this...
    http://www.suisin.co.jp/toku02/2007...
    (natural stone porn)

    http://www.ksky.ne.jp/~sumie99/togi...
    (natural stone porn convention)
    http://www.geocities.com/soatoz/ham...
    (a more realistic/do-able guide)
    Former German 'axe' user, turned Japanese knife fan, turned carbon steel lover, turned knife-tweaker.
    2+2=5


     
    mikemac
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    Re: Buffing and Polishing
    02-01-08 06:33.12 - Post#1437610    


        In response to Marko Tsourkan

    ...something I've seen re: refinishing the blade...using successively finer wet/dry sandpapers, criss cross your scratch pattern or else the deeper scratches will not get buffed out.

    As to sharpening...I'd suggest trying your hand on 1 or 2, and send Dave 1 or 2 to start. As a newbie to sharpening, you won't get close to what Dave does (there's only a few that are at that level), but you will get it sharp...just my $0.02
     
    jwpark
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    Re: Buffing and Polishing
    02-01-08 07:22.23 - Post#1437648    


        In response to mikemac

    I use wet/dry sand paper up to 2000 grit, then I switch to micro mesh sand paper for every 1000 intervals up to 6000. You can use your fingers but thats a lot of wear on you finger. I use a thick felt you can get a wood working store.

    That leaves a pretty close mirror like finish, but theres some scratch marks that you can see from certain angles under a light. But that's as far as I've gone. I want to some polish compound to get out the scratches. Hopefully pick something up at my next trip to the auto part/supply store.

    My friend told me about Cape Cod Polish Cloth. He uses it to polish his pricy watches when the get scuffed. Anyone use that before??

    Jay
    Jay

    • watercrawl Said:
    It's a MANkiri!!



     
    Marko Tsourkan
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    Re: Buffing and Polishing
    02-01-08 11:35.59 - Post#1437862    


        In response to jwpark

    Thanks, everybody -
    I think using sand paper allows a better control than using stones, so I will try this method. Regarding polishing compounds, I found this company that offers a full range of them as well as other buffing supplies.
    http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs...
    It might be a while before I get to it, but I will definitely post the results.
    I love fools’ experiments. I am always making them. C.Darwin

    Join Me on Facebook

    www.markotsourkan.com


     
    rogue108
    Journeyman KnifeNut!
    *
    06-09-09 15:23.59 - Post#1860501    


        In response to Marko Tsourkan

    I am bring this topic back from the dead as I am interested to see if Jay or Marko have any more input on this.

    I just recently started sharpening and left a couple of ugly marks on my Tojiro Santoku with a Chosera 1K. I would like to polish the scratches from the blade them out to restore the shiny finish.

    Any input on what Micro Mesh you used or any other technique is appreciated.

    Hopefully my inexperience and sloppy skill gets better soon.
    -- Andrew


     
    Socrates7
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    06-09-09 15:27.03 - Post#1860502    


        In response to rogue108

    • rogue108 Said:
    I am bring this topic back from the dead as I am interested to see if Jay or Marko have any more input on this.

    I just recently started sharpening and left a couple of ugly marks on my Tojiro Santoku with a Chosera 1K. I would like to polish the scratches from the blade them out to restore the shiny finish.

    Any input on what Micro Mesh you used or any other technique is appreciated.

    Hopefully my inexperience and sloppy skill gets better soon.



    Good call and me too, please!
    -Scot

    -------------

    Why oh why didn't I take the BLUE pill?


     
    JBroida
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    06-09-09 15:33.18 - Post#1860505    


        In response to Socrates7

    i just started using micromesh and this is what i do... i bought their whole starter set which comes with a tool for getting even surface pressure while sanding... i take my blade through each grit up to 12000 using a circular buffing motion... mirror polish finish when i have the time and patience.

    As a side note, i dont mirror polish service knives.


    -Jon
    Japanese Knife Imports
    High-end, hand-crafted Japanese kitchen knives
    JKI Blog
    On Facebook


     
    Throw3636
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    06-09-09 16:08.35 - Post#1860531    


        In response to rogue108

    ... there is an instruction video for that from Tatsuya (Suisin) too: http://www.suisin.co.jp/Japanese/to...
    Thomas



    George: So... my whole life, everything... All I get to keep are thoughts and memories?
    Rube: That's all we ever have, Peanut.


     
    ChrisBelgium
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    06-09-09 21:03.33 - Post#1860592    


        In response to Marko Tsourkan

    I use wet sandpaper from 600 up to 1200 and decrease force when using higher grits. Also very handy; don't throw away worn out 1200 sandpaper! Produce some mud on a finer natural stone and use it on a worn out sandpaper to finish polishing blades with sandpaper!!
    I found out it is better to always end with strokes parallel to the manufacturers grinding, which is from spine to edge.
    After that I use a simple but very efficient household metal buffing compound on a piece of steelwool size 0000, then use a dry clean cloth to polish.
    Chris

    "A true friend stabs you in the front" - Oscar Wilde


     


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