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    Username Post: IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review        (Topic#793265)
    Estela
    Moderator
    *
    04-14-07 18:00.37 - Post#1205926    













    Review of Immediate Personal Defense Handgun Course April 14, 2007

    There is a clear distinction between marksmanship training and self-defense handgun training. While marksmanship training requires a proper stance, sight alignment, controlled breathing and trigger control, self-defense training is much grittier and practical for those who rely on their handguns to protect them in a life or death situation. Recently, I attended the IPD Systems Handgun Course at the Bridgeport Shooting Range in Bridgeport, CT and I realized how my previous training and practice in marksmanship handgun shooting does not compare in practicality and usefulness as the IPD system.

    As my instructor, Gary Belanger, pointed out early in the class, defensive handgun shooting is truly a personal act. You must be prepared to face the consequences of ending someone’s life to protect yours. The class was an eye opening experience for many in the room comprised of Law Enforcement, Security and other professionals. All of the class had firearms training previously and our shooting preferences, both weaver and isosceles would soon be replaced with the IPD stance.

    The course started off with an explanation of the stance. If you could picture a child who is asked to give back a delicious candy bar pulling it close and rotating like a tank turret away from you, you have the basic idea of the IPD stance. Instead of holding the firearm far away from your center axis, you keep it close. IPD is the civilian version of the Center Axis Relock (CAR) system commonly taught to law enforcement agencies. The IPD stance is very stable and works with your body’s natural tendencies. It greatly reduces felt recoil and allows for fast follow up shots. By the end of the course, I had no trouble firing 5 shots or more in under a second and keep them all center mass on the target. We ran some drills that put 4 rounds center mass and 4 rounds in the head in under 2 seconds. If that won’t stop an attacker, I think nothing short of a garlic-flavored, silver bullet tipped with mystical juju dust would.

    This brings up an interesting difference between marksmanship shooting and self-defense shooting. While marksmanship is about group size and hopefully achieving the smallest grouping, the IPD system focuses on sending volume of fire on the target rapidly. An interesting point was made that numerous shots on the body, even if spread out, will interrupt the body’s functions and quickly incapacitate the aggressor. Also, the instructors all agreed that the idea of the “one shot stop? is quickly fading away. More than likely, you will not fire a single shot in self defense. If you fire more than one and make it count on center mass, you have a better chance of stopping an attack. You start the engagement and you end it, that is your responsibility.

    The course covered many topics including weapon selection, home defense, weapon retention, weapon striking, reloading, shooting while sitting and in the car, how to switch hands and fire, how to retreat and keep the firearm trained on the target, engaging multiple targets on the move and how to properly enter a room if need be and minimize your entrance while sweeping the room with your firearm. There were many great exercises we watched the instructors model and we drilled time and time again. The instruction was top notch combining PowerPoint and video along with practical hands on demos. The class was never too instructor-centered but student-centered instead. We would watch the instructors, try it ourselves and receive excellent hands on feedback from a 2 to 1 student to instructor ratio.

    I used my Glock 21 .45acp in a Galco Combat Master holster and my Glock 19 9mm in a Blade-Tech IWB holster. My magazine pouch is a basic Eagle Industries Double Magazine Pouch with the flaps tucked between my pistol belt and instructors belt from The Wilderness. Ammo was UMC ball, shooting glasses by Wiley’s and run of the mill ear muffs. I wanted to run the course using my two main CCW firearms. My G21 is my carry gun whenever the weather permits or whenever I venture into the woods where 2 legged threats are more likely than 4. My G19 is my summer carry gun and it sees a lot of use. Both guns functioned flawlessly and I easily went through 500 rounds of ammunition during the drills. I’d suggest a magazine loader to help save your thumbs and at least 6 magazines to keep your bottom feeder running. On an interesting side note, one of the student’s Beretta 92FS pistols suffered a major problem. Part of the locking block broke off and the gun would not function. This is a mil-spec firearm and it could not handle the course. None of the Glock pistols had any trouble running or handling the demands of rapid firing and self-defense drills.

    After taking this course, I have just one regret; I wish I took this as soon as I received my permit to carry concealed. Years later, I picked up skills I should have had all along. This class is by far, the best training I’ve ever had involving a handgun. I am more confident using my Glocks and, having fired them with excellent combat accuracy and trigger control, will be more likely to survive a dangerous encounter. Of course, more practice is required to stay fresh and this new shooting style is growing on me the more I use it. I feel it is almost second nature to use it and this is only after the first day of learning it.

    While it is impossible to list all the events of the class here in this brief review, it is possible to say this, “I’m very satisfied with this course and highly recommend it to anyone who intends to carry a handgun for self defense?. I’ll use my “thumbs high? grip for target shooting but the IPD system is my choice for combat shooting. My next step is to continue practicing with this system and then look into the carbine class. At the end of the class, Gary broke out his M16 SBR converted to .40 s&w. This little full-auto beauty shot so sweetly and reinvigorated all of us who’s trigger fingers were tired from a full day’s shoot.

    I can’t speak highly enough of this course. If you want to know more, visit their website, www.ipdsystems.com Be forewarned, shooting in this style requires a certain comfort level with your firearm. You will feel the concussion from rounds going off near your body. You will feel the heat of the muzzle flash. You will feel uneasy but it will pass. Just take a class, learn to shoot in harmony with your body’s mechanics and open up a whole new world of shooting skills you never knew you had.

    By the way, in the end, you get to shoot a T-Shirt and keep it to remember your training experience. Just think of it as a kind of a unique way of recognizing your skills and showing your support of the system.



       Attachment

    Kev

    Owner/Head Instructor
    Estela Wilderness Education

    Find it on Facebook!
    Follow me on Twitter @EstelaWildEd


     


    Estela
    Moderator
    *
    Re: IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review
    04-14-07 18:09.36 - Post#1205930    


        In response to Estela









    A few more pictures...

       Attachment

    Kev

    Owner/Head Instructor
    Estela Wilderness Education

    Find it on Facebook!
    Follow me on Twitter @EstelaWildEd


     
    Ice_Tigre
    What are you lookin' at?
    *
    04-14-07 19:46.41 - Post#1205958    


        In response to Estela

    An interesting idea, the close in hold and stance. Does look to be more practical in this type of scenario.

    I intend to go through the website in detail, but, is this for auto users only, or can you run the course with a revolver?

    Good review, looks like you had a blast!

    G.
    Gary Blessing
    Just Another Traditional Country Boy


     
    Estela
    Moderator
    *
    04-15-07 01:35.48 - Post#1206028    


        In response to Ice_Tigre

    You could run the class with a revolver but you would have to reload fast. If you had to do it, get an 8 shot Smith. It really is shot best with the master blaster, the Glock. The short trigger reset combined with high capacity magazines make this technique devastating.
    Kev

    Owner/Head Instructor
    Estela Wilderness Education

    Find it on Facebook!
    Follow me on Twitter @EstelaWildEd


     
    scaatylobo
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    04-15-07 02:12.39 - Post#1206047    


        In response to Estela

    Estela.I am a D/T and firearms instructor w/my P.D. and have taught some of what you showed and I am impressed with your article and your writing.We are not able to teach LEO's some of that as they are not capable of even making qual's on a regular yearly basis !.Some of what you discuss I would like to see you demo at PWYP,in a safe manner of course.It is a sorry thing to note but not all who EDC a pistol [ including LEO's ] take the time to learn the skills NEEDED.Nice job and well done,I too EDC a Glock [ Glocks ] .
    " A Bad Day Living,Beats A Good Day Dead"


     
    Estela
    Moderator
    *
    IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review
    04-15-07 12:07.45 - Post#1206372    


        In response to scaatylobo

    For your viewing pleasure, here are a few short videos of the system in action. One of our instructors,Brian, is seen in the first video on the very far left. Check it out if you get a chance.

    IPD IN ACTION
    Kev

    Owner/Head Instructor
    Estela Wilderness Education

    Find it on Facebook!
    Follow me on Twitter @EstelaWildEd




    Edited by Estela on 04-15-07 14:43.36. Reason for edit: No reason given.
     
    Ready
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    Re: IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review
    04-23-07 09:57.30 - Post#1211573    


        In response to Estela

    Kev,

    Great review, and thanks for sharing about this method. I learned a lot from you at PWYP and got to put a few downrange using this method. I really do like it and was beginning to feel more comfortable with it by the end of our range time.

    Had a great time, but those 3" magnums really left a mark!

    Thanks again.

    Ready
    "Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." Theodore Roosevelt


     
    scaatylobo
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    Re: IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review
    04-25-07 04:11.17 - Post#1212967    


        In response to Ready

    • Ready Said:
    Kev,

    Great review, and thanks for sharing about this method. I learned a lot from you at PWYP and got to put a few downrange using this method. I really do like it and was beginning to feel more comfortable with it by the end of our range time.

    Had a great time, but those 3" magnums really left a mark!

    Thanks again.

    Ready


    The 3" mag's were my bad,sorry if ya got a boo boo.
    " A Bad Day Living,Beats A Good Day Dead"


     
    Estela
    Moderator
    *
    Re: IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review
    04-27-07 14:01.56 - Post#1215193    


        In response to scaatylobo

    Recently on Glocktalk.com, a discussion has been brewing about the merits of the CAR/IPDS system. Gary Belanger, my instructor for this course just responded with the following.

    For the full article, click the link here

    Wow! Let me say that I am having a great deal of trouble understanding what I just read above pertaining to the CAR system. As a Master Instructor for Sabre Tactical and the system as well as a Master Instructor who has taught this system to hundreds of Officers around the country, the explanation above is not an accurate portrayal or account of the system. Firstly CAR is not a shooting stance, it is a platform if you will, a non-discriminatory platform, a solid base from where we can either shoot handgun, shoot rifle, use a baton or even OC spray. It is non-discriminatory because the system works whether you are male or female, large breasted or small breasted, short or tall, fat or skinny. The system works because we are working in harmony with our body, we hold our weapons (whatever the case) in a manner that is comfortable and relaxed and yet allows us to have complete control of whatever weapon we are using while reducing felt recoil by approximately 85%. Yes in CAR we do utilize the bladed stance because time and time again it has been demonstrated and proven in all self defense arenas that of the two (bladed and square on) the bladed is the most stable. Think about it, the bladed stance is where we shoot our shotguns and rifles from, where we box from, where we fence from; it is where we are our most agile and offers our opponent the smallest target, it is also where our body wants to revert to when we are in fight or flight. Look at the average wrestler, you go for your opponent while he is square on because he is so much more vulnerable to being knocked over.

    In utilizing the proper bladed stance that we do in CAR there is no exposed armpit hole, whereas in the standard squared on stance both armpits are exposed. When in the proper bladed stance in CAR your side is shielded by your side wrap on your vest, if you are wearing one and by your whole upper arm. If you were to take a round to the upper arm it would likely penetrate the outside layer of skin and perhaps penetrate into the muscle of your arm or lodge itself in the bone. However, should that round manage to penetrate the average 4? muscle it will meet up with the next layers of skin, those layers of skin react completely different than the outside layers do. Those layers of skin because they are being stretched from the inside out have a tendency to stretch much further and equate to approximate the equivalent of an additional 4 “ of muscle. Now that round has penetrated approximately 8? of tissue, a pretty challenging task for a handgun round. Think about it, why would anyone want to stand square on and offer the bad guy this huge life-size target when he can stand in a more stable stance while offering a smaller target? And if you had to step back it is a simple matter of just stepping back, all the while always balanced. If you were forced to retreat to a better position it is a simple matter of turning your head and running not turning your whole body around.

    The “cradle? position as you call it is known as the “High Position? is again a position gained from working with and in harmony with our bodies. It provides the best form of weapon retention available should your weapon be out of its holster. Think of it in this manner, imagine if you will any 3,4,5,6 year old child that you have just given a chocolate bar to and now just seconds later you tell that same child that you want it back instinctively the child will clutch that candy bar in the center of his chest and blade to you. Why? Not because he was trained that way but because his mind and body instinctively know that the center clutching position is where his possession is most secure. The position is meant for retention however, it can be utilized as a shooting position if the need arises and is both secure and extremely stable.

    The “other? position you mention the primary position, officially know as the Extended Position is in fact the primary shooting position. We concentrate on bringing the weapon back in towards our center axis. We bring the front sight of our weapon into our individual focal point for better, faster alignment and more controlled recoil. Think about this, for years now we have been told that for 99% of personal protection, self defense or close quarters shooting that we need to concentrate on the front sight yet at the same time they’re telling you to extend your arms out straight out in front of you, an average of 22? out when the average persons focal point for concentration is 14? -17?. Does that not seem contrary?

    One of CAR's key features is the systems ability to reduce felt recoil, a very big plus if you are looking to place 2 or more quick rounds with accuracy. The systems allows the average shooter with a little trigger time to easily shoot 4,5 and 6 shots in under 1 second with no misses and complete trigger control. Think about it, what slows us down for every shot is dealing with the recoil or felt recoil of the shot just prior, if you had 85% less of that recoil to deal with your shots can be that much faster and that much more accurate.

    Yes you were right when you stated that CAR was primarily taught to LE/ MIL however, as of very recent a modified version of CAR is being taught to the law abiding permit carrying civilian world under the name of IPDS (Immediate Personal Defense System) (www.ipdsystems.com) I know this because I taught the very first class in the country on April 14, 2007 in Bridgeport CT. .Contrary to your thought or knowledge CAR is gaining in popularity in both the LE/MIL world as well as the civilian world. On average the principal or system itself is receiving approximately 150,000 hits per month and steadily climbing and as they say “coming to a theater near you.?

    I implore you to give the system a fair shake and I guarantee you will be impressed. I am so confident that if you PM me with your info I will contact you and if at all possible spend a training day with you at no cost just to let me have the opportunity to change your mind..

    Sincerely

    Gary Belanger
    Master Instructor / Sabre Tactical
    Master Instructor / IPDS
    Chief Instructor / Performance Tactical
    Kev

    Owner/Head Instructor
    Estela Wilderness Education

    Find it on Facebook!
    Follow me on Twitter @EstelaWildEd


     
    Estela
    Moderator
    *
    Re: IPD Defensive Handgun Course Review
    04-27-07 14:07.28 - Post#1215197    


        In response to Estela

    A group shot.



       Attachment

    Kev

    Owner/Head Instructor
    Estela Wilderness Education

    Find it on Facebook!
    Follow me on Twitter @EstelaWildEd


     


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