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    Username Post: Tomahawk vs. Axe/Hatchet        (Topic#750334)
    coolhand68
    Journeyman KnifeNut!
    *
    09-12-05 20:27.16 - Post#752937    



    I read somewhere (not sure if it was a magazine or internet article) that a tomahawk was a much better tool to have on hand than an axe. I can't remember the reasoning behind it, can anyone offer any reasons's as to why one would be better than the other. If I remember correctly the article claimed the tomahawk was better when used during camping/hiking.

    On that note who makes some of the better tomahawks?
     
    Esav Benyamin
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    09-12-05 20:53.27 - Post#752943    


        In response to coolhand68

    Tough call. Tomahawks originally were war clubs, a big stick with a ball at the end, often with a spike in it. For braining people. Later the Europeans brought in narrow axehead type tomahawks.

    Why this should be better for woodcraft of any kind than a dedicated cutting tool, I can't imagine. After all, there are a great variety of axes and hatchets, each speciifc to a particular cutting task.
    http://www.AKTI.org
    http://www.USKTA.org


     
    DGGG
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    09-13-05 00:46.08 - Post#753002    


        In response to coolhand68

    Wrong, wrong, wrong.

    If that were the case why wouldn't everyone be buying them instead of axes?

    There are lots of great camping axe/hatchets. Just check with the sellers at the top of the page.
     
    defender90
    Member
    *
    09-13-05 11:37.45 - Post#753360    


        In response to DGGG

    I don't know for sure, but I have been told that the tomahawk has a tapered hole to insert the handle from the top. This makes replacement of the handle in the field easier.
    An Axe/hatchet has more of an hourglass shape inside so the handle must be drilled/burned out and a new handle wedged in.
    Having tried to make a replacemdnt axe handle in the field I can tell you it is not as easy as you see it described some places.
    Don't know how good my info is :> , when I was told it made sense to me.
     
    DGGG
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    09-14-05 00:55.48 - Post#753732    


        In response to defender90

    • defender90 Said:
    I don't know for sure, but I have been told that the tomahawk has a tapered hole to insert the handle from the top. This makes replacement of the handle in the field easier.
    An Axe/hatchet has more of an hourglass shape inside so the handle must be drilled/burned out and a new handle wedged in.
    Having tried to make a replacemdnt axe handle in the field I can tell you it is not as easy as you see it described some places.
    Don't know how good my info is :> , when I was told it made sense to me.



    The only time I ever replaced an ax handle was when I missed and split the handle on a big log. If the handle was inserted properly (and straight wood) it rarely needs to be replaced. Most come with a split end and all you need to do is drive the wedge in and trim off the excess. To get the head off a broken ax I used my portable power drill to drill out the wedge and the the handle popped out easily (from the bottom of the head). When I added a new handle I cut and sanded the handle so I had a pretty accurate fit going in. The wedge just bound it very tightly into the head of the ax.

    It will never replace my Stihl chainsaw, heh heh!
     
    MikeStewart
    Master Member KnifeNut!
    *
    09-14-05 06:32.28 - Post#753944    


        In response to DGGG

    Without going into too much detail.

    Tomahawks are not Amreican or Native American.

    Native Americans --prior to Western or European contact--only had War Clubs, Stone Axes and Copper Axes.

    Native Americans did not Smelt Iron so therefore did not have steel.

    The first Tomahawks were most likely brought here by the French.

    Axes , Hatchets and War Axes were common to the French culture prior to the 1st Century A.D. to as late as W.W. II. French Army Engineer units still issue an axe that looks like what we Call a Tomahawk.

    The earliest Tomohawks were traded , By the French, to the Native American Tribes for Furs and Provisions.

    Once the French established themselves here on the continent--The English also opened trade and exploration and brought Sheffield Made Hawks (Small Axes) with them also.

    They were more than weapons and were used for light chopping and camp chores.

    The Tomahaks became a trade item--a tool for mountian Men and a weapon for both Civillians--Native Americans and Some Early Military Units here on the Contenent.

    Lewis & Clark ( 1805) had Hawks with them as tools--weapons and trade items.

    The usefulness of a Hawk is directly related to the quality of the Hawk or the quality of the Hatchet you are comparing it too. Both can be useful tools and both can be effective weapons.

    The hatchet will always Split wood better than a Hawk becaause there is a slower transition from the edge to the eye. The abrupt change from the edge--thru the face and to the eye of a hawk will stop the hawk in a log--rather than allow the head to smoothly open the split and continue down thru the log.

    The Hawk will chop the same --better--or worse depending on the weight and geometry of both tools that you are comparing.

    You have asked a Very--Very--Very technical Question that there is NO easy answer.

    You can only start by giving the absolute specific two tools to be compared.

    There is no general answer to your question.

    Sorry I couldn't be more help but what I have said above.

    There is a lot going on when you swing an axe at something and it's very difficult to address it in general terms.

    Mike.......................
    BRKCA MIKE #01
    NJKCA #041

    "I Am America"

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    RIP Chris + 1


     
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